Sunday Brunch 3: What albums will you one day share with your children?

Brandon
I’ll get back to you in nine months. (Cue phone call from parents in…)

You have to be really careful what you introduce to kids. As much as I love The Money Store or other similarly offensive music, it’d be weird to introduce my children to it. Even with my musical expression wings clipped, I’ve still got a ton of safe bets I can share: most of Daft Punk, a lot of the Black Keys, White Stripes, Gorillaz. You’ll notice these are all big names of today, but to me, that’s what you raid your dad’s cassette cabinet for, anyway.

Alex
I’m not going to be my dad and blast Pretty Hate Machine in the car while driving around with my two year old.   While I would show my children all of the artists that Brandon mentioned, I would also introduce them to classic albums such as Ziggy Stardust, The Beatles, and Boy.  I would also introducing them to the albums of this generation like Room on Fire, Wasting Light, and Return to Cookie Mountain.  I  would also show them albums from the current time, of course, age appropriate ones.

Finney
I’d introduce my kids to a mix of my old music tastes (such as Journey and Foreigner) as well as my tastes in current artists (such as Foster the People and Miami Horror). The reason I’d do this is to expose my kids to a wide variety of music at a young age. This way, they can find which kinds of artists and songs they like. These artists and songs can leave a lasting impression on their musical tastes for the rest of their lives, which is something I missed out on as a child.

Share Button

Sunday Brunch 2: If you could send one album to the year 1950, what would it be?

Brandon
I would send the first Rage Against the Machine album back to Senator McCarthy’s doorstep with a note attached saying “this is an accurate representation of the political views of Americans in 1992.” The note’s a blatant lie, but the guy needed to be trolled. Then I’d go back to the future, make sure the US didn’t turn into a dictatorship because of that action. Then I’d go back and watch his reaction. Or maybe I’d just blast Johnny B. Goode with my car windows rolled down, going 88 miles per hour. Seems easier.

Alex
I would send back Miles Davis’ Kind of Blue. “But Alex!”, you say, “Kind of Blue came out in 1959to which I say, “I don’t care, because 1959 is nine years after 1950”.  The reason I would send back Kind of Blue is because Miles Davis eventually moved on to jazz fusion and I wish there was another ten years of pre-jazz fusion Miles Davis.  I have never been big on the genre of jazz fusion.  I like jazz guitar, but the guitar styles used in jazz fusion never really meshed as well, in my opinion.

Finney
I would send Daft Punk’s Discovery back to 1950. Discovery consists of many reworked disco samples from the 51-year span from 1950 to 2001’s Discovery. It would be interesting to see reactions to not only what their music would evolve into in 25 years, but it would also show how those songs could be reworked into pop music hits another 25 years later.  Additionally, pioneers of the electronic/disco genres such as Giorgio Moroder would hear the songs on Discovery much earlier, causing electronic music to evolve at a much faster pace. We’d have dubstep as early as the mid-sixties!

 

Share Button

Sunday Brunch 1: What was the first album you ever loved?

Brandon
Superunknown by Soundgarden. When I was 16, I started really caring about music: a late start compared to T4B’s resident child prodigy. Soundgarden was the first band that blew my mind, and that’s pretty silly since it was 2009: over a decade after they broke up and nearly fifteen years after grunge stopped being vogue. I didn’t care. Superunknown rocked in 1994, rocked in 2009 when I found it, and it still rocks in 2014. I’ve probably listened to that album 75 or more times, and I can still listen to it now. Black hole sun, indeed.

Alex
How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb by U2.  “Vertigo” was one of the two songs  I would take my dad’s iPod for so I could listen to it on repeat (the other was the Hawaii Five-O theme).  When I finally got my own iPod, I had the whole album on there, and I progressed to listening to that entire album on repeat.  Something about that album made me love it.  I do not know if it was the songwriting or something else, but that album was my jam for a good two years.

Finney
Blast Tyrant by Clutch. Before I entered middle school, I never listened to music, ever. When I hit the sixth grade, this album was one of the very first albums I ever listened to, and I instantly fell in love with it. I’d have a different favorite song every week, as the album was really easy to listen to. I loved the heavy riffs on many of the songs, and hearing the heavy guitars was a crucial turning point leading me to venture further into the genre. This led me to discover many of my current favorite bands and songs.

Share Button